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  • As companies continue to struggle with staffing shortages, many employers may consider offering bonuses or other incentives to employees as a means of attracting talent to their workforce.  While this may be a prudent and effective means of hiring and retaining employees, companies should be aware of the potential overtime implications arising from awarding certain bonuses to nonexempt employees.

  • The White House Task Force on Worker Organizing and Empowerment recently released a report to the President listing policy recommendations intended to promote unionization in both public and private sectors.

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  • On March 24, 2022, Utah joined California, Virginia and Colorado to become the fourth state to enact a comprehensive consumer privacy law. The Utah Consumer Privacy Act (the “UCPA”) has similarities to the existing privacy laws enacted by California (the “CCPA”), Virginia (the “VCDPA”) and Colorado (the “CPA”). Certain aspects of the UCPA’s approach, however, are distinct from those other privacy laws. Generally, the UCPA applies to a more narrow scope of businesses, and more categories of data fall outside of the UCPA’s definition of “personal data” -- thereby imposing less of a burden on businesses. Below we’ve provided a high-level summary of the UCPA’s general requirements and certain of its differences and similarities to consumer privacy laws enacted by other states.

  • The increase in cyber breaches and hacks has resulted in litigation, some involving policy interpretation, and some involving new theories of liability. The two cases described below are illustrations of the types of issues that businesses, insureds and insurers continue to face as result of cyber liability. In the first case, the court found that a traditional general liability policy could provide coverage for a cyber breach, a result likely not anticipated by the insurance carrier, nor possibly by the insured. The second case involves injury and death, allegedly caused by a hospital’s inability to use monitoring equipment during a birth because the equipment was inoperable due to a ransomware attack, that likely would be covered under a traditional medical malpractice policy despite the fact that it was a cyber attack that gave rise to the claim for injury and medical negligence.

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