Search:

Recent Posts

Popular Topics

Contributors

Archives

Legal developments in data, privacy, cybersecurity, and other emerging technology issues

Posts in Infosec Plan.

Because the use of passwords alone is a relatively weak method to prove identity, enforcement agencies are ramping up pressure for companies to implement multi-factor authentication (MFA) both internally and to customers for online services. MFA makes it more difficult for cyber threat actors to gain access to networks and information systems if authentication information, such as passwords, is compromised through phishing attacks or other means. Below is information that may be helpful in assessing whether your company should implement MFA, and how to do so.

Last week, the New York Attorney General’s office offered guidance regarding credential stuffing, a common and costly attack on businesses and consumers, in which threat actors repeatedly attempt to log in to online accounts using usernames and passwords stolen from other online services.  Credential stuffing takes advantage of three aspects of the online ecosystem:  (1) most online accounts utilize usernames and passwords; (2) a steady flow of data breaches has resulted in billions of stolen credentials being leaked onto the dark web for other threat actors to exploit; and (3) consumers tend to reuse the same passwords across multiple online services. 

Jump to Page

By using this site, you agree to our Privacy Policy and our Disclaimer.