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Showing 5 posts in State Privacy Law.

The Death of the Date of Birth

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Michigan state courts have new privacy protections in court rules that become effective July 1, 2021 (links to the implementing orders are included below) after implementation was previously delayed.  Under revised Michigan Court Rule (“MCR”) 1.109 and 8.119, parties are no longer able to file papers – including pleadings, motions, and briefs – or attachments containing specified types of personally identifying information (PII) such as date of birth, financial account numbers, driver’s license numbers, state-issued personal identification card numbers, or passport numbers.  The existing prohibition on filing more than the last four digits of a social security number remains in force.  The revised MCR 1.109 calls for parties and their attorneys to redact any PII and to prepare a separate form listing the un-redacted information and reference codes to be used in the public document.  That separate form is considered a nonpublic document and is available only to the court, the parties, and other specified persons.  Anyone obtaining a copy of a publicly filed document will receive only the redacted copy and not the separate form. More

Recent State Biometric Privacy Bills Put Spotlight On Federal Regulation

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New York And Maryland Propose BIPA-Like Biometric Privacy Bills
New York Assembly Bill 27—introduced on January 6, 2021—seeks to amend the New York general business law in relation to biometric privacy.  Similarly, Maryland House Bill 218—introduced on January 13, 2021—proposes biometric privacy regulations on private entities in Maryland. More

(Don’t) Send in the Drones

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The Michigan Court of Appeals issued a recent opinion in Long Lake Township v. Maxon, considering the question of whether a private landowner had a reasonable expectation of privacy that would preclude the government from flying a drone over their property.  The Court concluded that there was an expectation of privacy, and distinguished expectations of privacy from drones from those expected of plane or helicopter surveillance.  (A dissent argues that U.S. Supreme Court precedent on the Fourth Amendment mandated the opposite result.) More

Utah Becomes Second State to Adopt a Safe Harbor for Compliance with a Written Cybersecurity Program

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With the passage of the Cybersecurity Affirmative Defense Act, Utah became the second state – after Ohio’s Data Protection Act in 2018 – to create an affirmative defense to certain causes of action stemming from a data breach.  The law provides an affirmative defense under Utah law and in Utah courts to certain tort claims arising out of a data breach if the company demonstrates that it created, maintained, and reasonably complied with a written cybersecurity program.   More

Requirements for Businesses under Virginia’s New Consumer Data Protection Act

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With Governor Ralph Northam’s signature yesterday, the Consumer Data Protection Act (“CDPA”) became law, making Virginia the second state after California to enact a comprehensive privacy law (with apologies to Nevada, which also has passed more modest privacy legislation). Although similar in many respects to the California Consumer Privacy Act (“CCPA”), which was recently updated by the Consumer Privacy Rights Act (“CPRA”), the law contains terminology more consistent with the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”).  More

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